Prevention of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

How do you get a foot ulcer?

Surprisingly, the most common cause of ulcers in people with diabetes is constant pressure and rubbing, usually from ill-fitting footwear.

Diabetics are more prone to develop wounds that don’t heal easily due to:

Nerve damage or neuropathy – Those with nerve problems can develop a blister or a tiny wound and oftentimes not even notice that it is there.
Problems with circulation – This results to reduced oxygen supply to the feet and therefore have difficulty with wound healing.

Foot deformities such as toes becoming crooked or collapse of the arch.
To prevent foot ulcers, make sure that your shoes fit well. Prescription shoes or custom orthotics have the advantage of relieving areas of increased pressure, stabilizing foot deformities, and provide stability.

For socks, the best option is wearing white ones, typically cotton to easily detect any seepage or blood in from the feet.  If you have corns and calluses, see your podiatrist and resist the urge to file or treat it yourself. This can lead to injury and potential problems in the future.

If you have diabetes, it is recommended to use footwear both indoors and outdoors. Use stockings or socks to protect your feet. Change into clean socks on a daily basis. Cut your toenails regularly, resist the urge to manipulate your nails.

Wash your feet thoroughly, preferably mild antibacterial soap and dry thoroughly especially in spaces between the toes. Moisturizing the feet is very important, especially during the winter to keep the skin from cracking. Do not apply lotion between the toes.

Inspect your feet daily. It is best to have someone inspect it for you. If you must do it yourself, use a mirror to be sure to see every part of the soles, heels, and toes.

Go to a podiatrist or a foot doctor at least once or twice a year, whether or not you think you have a foot issue. A comprehensive foot examination will determine the risk factors that may result in foot ulcers or worse, consequent foot amputation.

If you develop a foot wound, have it checked immediately. Call your podiatrist to schedule an appointment as soon as possible.
At the Advanced Wound Healing Institute, we use advanced wound healing technologies to help keep patients out of the hospital and onto healing.
  • Faster recovery time
  • Better results
  • Improved long-term outlook
  • Optimal quality of life
We use in-office advanced wound healing products from Organogenesis

If you have a foot, ankle, leg, knee wound, do not delay.

See us at any of our locations throughout Lee, Collier and Charlotte Counties.

Your wound healing experts.
 

Access to specialist: Live Schedulers open 7 days a week 7am until 5pm Eastern Time, Portal and Self Service Portal open 24 hrs/7 days

Skin tears or lacerations are acute wounds. Foot and leg lacerations have a high probability of becoming complex chronic wounds, if not properly managed and treated immediately.
Most of these minor lower leg injuries heal on their own, and you should be seeing improvement and healing. However, more serious foot wounds and infections may need to be seen by a physician.
**There are approximately 29 million people with diabetes in the US and it is estimated that 25% people over the age of 65 have diabetes. Over the next 20 years, it is expected that this problem is only going to get worse.

When peripheral neuropathy develops, the incidence of ulcer formation increases.

The 3-year mortality for people with diabetes increases from 13% to 28% with an ulcer. Following a lower extremity amputation, the 5-year mortality increases to 60%.

Diabetic foot ulcers lead to amputation and mortality, and thus, it is very important to prevent them.

At the Advanced Wound Healing Institute, we offer specialized wound care for your feet and legs.

Our doctors are well trained from residency in conservative and advanced wound care options from simple debridement to advance grafting and flap techniques.

See why we are the first choice for limb salvage in Florida and the best wound care specialist near you from Naples, FL to Port Charlotte, FL.

Diabetic Foot Ulcers (DFUs) continue to be a major problem globally. Through the years, these continue to be among the most challenging chronic wound types. There is also a high chance of recurrence among DFUs.

Patients with diabetes are at increased risk for limb loss and associated mortality. Because of diabetic neuropathy, a type of nerve damage in the legs and feet, patients don’t feel what’s going on in the bottom of the foot.


Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerves throughout your body. Diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet.

Diabetic foot ulcers lead to amputation and mortality
Diabetic foot ulcers lead to amputation and mortality, and thus, it is very important to prevent them. At the Advanced Wound Healing Institute, we offer advanced wound care for your feet and legs.

Our doctors are well trained from residency in conservative and advanced wound care options from simple debridement to advance grafting and flap techniques.
American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Advanced wound care is a patient-centered and a multidisciplinary approach between podiatrist, vascular surgeon, and primary care doctor.

At the Advanced Wound Healing Institute, we specialize in the treatment of wounds that are difficult to heal. We offer the most current and advanced treatments in wound care.
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